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Can dogs eat lettuce?

by Katie Stone January 01, 2021 3 min read

A heart of romaine lettuce

Keeping your dog happy and healthy begins with his diet. And he needs a lot more than dog chow!

Knowing what your precious pooch can and can’t eat is one of the most important things about being a dog owner. Although you can’t watch what your dog eats all the time, you’re the one in charge of his meals and snacks. 

While it’s fun to experiment with feeding your dog different foods, there’s a fine line between what’s good and not good for him. Even the most careful dog owner can feed their precious companion the wrong things. 

Fortunately, there are lots offoods that are just as good for dogs as they are for people—and you might be surprised to learn how varied your dog’s diet can be when you add in some of the ‘human’ foods that dogs can eat.

One of those foods is lettuce. Lettuce is a leafy green plant that’s often used in salads and sandwiches. The four main types of lettuce include butterhead, iceberg, loose-leaf, and romaine. But can dogs eat lettuce?

Is lettuce safe for dogs?

Yes, dogs can eat lettuce. This crisp green veg is mostly made up of water, so it’s not toxic or dangerous to dogs. Small pieces are quite digestible, and may even offer some health benefits. 

The benefits of feeding dogs lettuce

Lettuce is one of the most widely consumed vegetables in the world, and its nutritional content is often underestimated. This salad vegetable is low in calories, fat, and sodium, so it’s a healthy snack for doggos who need to watch their weight!

Lettuce is also a source of fiber, which is helpful for keeping your dog’s digestive system in good working order. 

It provides a number of beneficial nutrients, including iron, folate, and vitamin C. 

Some studies have shown that the bioactive compounds in lettuce harbor beneficial compounds. These compounds may have anti-inflammatory, cholesterol-lowering, and anti-diabetic properties. These may contribute to your dog’s overall health and wellbeing. 

The high water content of lettuce may also help to keep your dog hydrated on hot summer days. Of course, it shouldn’t replace fresh drinking water. 

What kind of lettuce can dogs eat?

The nutritional content and bioactive compounds vary between different types of lettuce. The most popular type of lettuce in the US is crisphead lettuce. However, this lettuce contains the highest proportion of water, so it’s quite low in minerals, vitamins, and bioactive compounds.

The types of lettuce with the highest nutritional content include leaf-type lettuce and romaine. These have similar levels of folate (vitamin B9) to leafy green vegetables. Red pigmented lettuce also contains more antioxidants than green lettuce, particularly phenolic compounds.

The risks of feeding dogs salad

Lettuce may be safe for dogs, but that doesn’t mean you can serve him the kind of salad most humans would eat. Our own salads are likely to contain a variety of other ingredients that may not agree with a dog’s sensitive digestive system. 

Salad dressings may also be harmful. Avoid those that contain flavorings and artificial additives. There are also many ingredients that are commonly used in salad and are quite toxic to dogs, such as tomatoes, avocado, grapes, and garlic. Onions are also a definite no-no for dogs, as they can cause severe gastric distress. 

Tips for feeding your dog lettuce

Lettuce has a very mild taste, so your dog may not even be that interested in it at first. It should be fed in small amounts. Too much lettuce in one sitting can upset your dog’s tummy, which may lead to diarrhea. 

Be sure to thoroughly wash any lettuce that you give your dog in order to remove any pesticides or other chemicals. Chop the lettuce into small pieces to make it easier to chew. You might find that he enjoys chunks of fresh, crisp lettuce as treats rather than as a dish on its own!

If you have a picky eater on your hands, consider blending it up with some other healthy fruits and vegetables (strawberries,blueberries, and celery are great options!) and freezing it into molds for a healthy treat.


The article was written by Katie Stone on January 1, 2021.
Katie Stone
Katie Stone

Katie Stone is a qualified naturopath. She holds degrees in criminology, journalism, and natural medicine. Katie is a lifelong animal lover, who has a keen focus on pet health and how to treat animals with natural medicine. She writes for a wide range of online publications and loves making a difference in the lives of creatures great and small.



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